If I could be a Giant Tree, Long Leaf Pine it would Be!

Being an ancient Wood Affection Handicapped Human, I love the many qualities of this King of all Pines... nearly slaughtered into extinction & lost.

My favorite tree, nearly extinct in mature form, is a Long Leaf Pine Tree with 12" long needles for leaves, 2' long pine cones to seed with, yet in the first 7 years or more of life it barely works its way 7 inches out of the ground from seed. In a deeply shaded forest once upon a time, each tree was once an average of 48" in girth at the base and the elders stretching 135' or more into the sky, leaving a blanket of needles below, and a world of wildlife they nurtured and protected. Squirrels, birds, and critters of all sorts below lived in its arms safe, for low hanging branches were over 20' high.

The trees did not start fast, but at 185 years old matured enough to finally develop a Heart as they call the core that becomes a flexible spine allowing the tree to shoot up over the next 700 years, some years only gaining an eighth of an inch a year in girth at the bottom of the tree per year. Mature trees shed branches as they grew, such that it might be 40' up before you would have a branch to grab onto growing fresh from the tree.

Great storms create such pressures that only the giant Hearts of the Long Leaf Pines could bear winds and remain standing in the 50" of hurricane rains each year along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Georgia, once upon a time. By 1935 they were nearly all slaughtered, and the land abandoned by the lumber barons finally forced to pay help with cash instead of tokens in 1934 in Texas.

The trees sang in the woods for a millennium, indeed, peaceful, intelligent, aware, feeling the breeze that allowed them to flex and thus tighten their muscular walls of capillaries and push fluids above and below ground at pressures our machines could not do. The ions from the Earth that rose up through their bodies and fingers was the voice of God singing, connecting, and demonstrating the giants were still amongst us until we chopped them all down.

We are all frequency manifesting, sparkles off the sparkler someone else holds, and waves. I feel free, but my direction is somewhat determined by that hand that fires up my spark. Great trees like that represent such power, such intelligence, and grace that I have spent much of my life-preserving and respecting a wood that took a thousand years to grow and could last for nearly that long if cared for in homes and preserved.

Mankind came along in America in the 1830s when these ancient elders of the forest had been using their hydraulic jackhammers of roots to break the rocks, move the nutrients, and create an environment by taking advantage of the winds to bend, and in doing so, create such pressures that only the giant Hearts of the Long Leaf Pines could bear in the 50" rains of hurricanes each year along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Georgia, once upon a time.

By 1935 they were nearly all slaughtered, and the land abandoned by the lumber barons finally forced to pay help with cash instead of tokens in 1934 in Texas. The trees sang in the woods for a millennium, indeed, peaceful, intelligent, aware, feeling the breeze that allowed them to flex and thus tighten their muscular walls of capillaries and push fluids above and below ground at pressures our machines could not do.

The ions from the Earth that rose up through their bodies and fingers was the voice of God singing, connecting, and demonstrating the giants were still amongst us until we chopped them all down.

Imagine Being a tree for 1,200 years or more of watching, listening, peacefully sharing your shade, your shelter, your heart, and in the end be slaughtered, used to create some houses, then thrown away even though your parts and pieces could house many a person, other creatures of Source energy that makes this whole story worth living on a level of gratitude.

Thank you for the world that we have to work with, and I honor it by reusing it until there is no more before cutting down the little trees, just children in the forest that will someday be great. Nurture tomorrow by honoring the greatest trees of our past.

Let the life of a tree, much shorter for me, be an analogy of how our best years can be when we are older. Now you see?

Darby